Fb admits to inadvertently storing ‘lots of of thousands and thousands’ of consumer passwords in plain textual content on firm servers


Facebook officers admitted on Thursday that the tech large saved lots of of thousands and thousands of consumer passwords in plain textual content — capable of be learn by staff.

“As a part of a routine safety evaluation in January, we discovered that some consumer passwords had been being saved in a readable format inside our inside knowledge storage techniques,” Facebook’s vp of engineering, safety and privateness Pedro Canahuati wrote in a post on the corporate’s web site Thursday morning.

(STOCK PHOTO/Getty Photographs)

“This caught our consideration as a result of our login techniques are designed to masks passwords utilizing strategies that make them unreadable,” he added. “We now have fastened these points and as a precaution we shall be notifying everybody whose passwords we’ve discovered had been saved on this approach.”

The corporate didn’t say why it waited till March to inform customers.

We estimate that we’ll notify lots of of thousands and thousands of Fb Lite customers, tens of thousands and thousands of different Fb customers, and tens of hundreds of Instagram customers.

The information was first reported by the cybersecurity journalist Brian Krebs on his blog, Krebs on Safety, earlier than Fb issued its assertion. Though the corporate didn’t disclose how lengthy the passwords had been insecurely saved, Krebs’ report mentioned the issue existed for years.

The corporate mentioned the passwords weren’t seen to anybody exterior of the corporate, including that “we’ve discovered no proof up to now that anybody internally abused or improperly accessed them.”

“We estimate that we’ll notify lots of of thousands and thousands of Fb Lite customers, tens of thousands and thousands of different Fb customers, and tens of hundreds of Instagram customers. Fb Lite is a model of Fb predominantly utilized by folks in areas with decrease connectivity,” Canahuati wrote.

Fb recommends customers change their passwords and use two-factor authentication or a safety key.



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